Nonfat, Low-Carb Chocolate Chip Cookies

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Ingredients Grams of Carbohydrate Grams of Fat
Dry Ingredients
1 cup oat flour (You could substitute flax or spelt.) 58.5 0
1 t baking powder 1.2 0
½ t soda 0 0
½ t salt 0 0
½ t cinnamon 0 0
2 T peanut butter 6 16
1 c xylitol 48* 0
Wet Ingredients
1 T molasses 15 0
2 T egg white 0 0
¼ cup applesauce 7 0
½ tsp vanilla 0 0
2 cups quinoa flakes 218 0
.25 cup semisweet chocolate** 41.3 0
.25 cup baking chocolate 8 14
Instructions:Mix dry ingredients and wet ingredients separately. Combine. Drop by rounded teaspoon onto lightly greased cookie sheet. Bake at 350 degrees for 10-12’. Makes 30 cookies
Total carbs and fats in entire recipe 403 30
Total divided by 30 cookies 13.43 1.2
Number of grams of carbohydrates and fats allowed in a single THM snack 45 4-9

*There are 4 grams of carbohydrates / tsp in NOW brand.

**Please Note: I have also made this recipe with unsweetened baking chocolate. Doing so cuts the refined sugar to zero and reduces the carbs considerably.

Carbs + Fat = Weight Gain

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For the past three days I decided to take a break from my diet by mixing a few fats and carbs in one or two meals per day. I didn’t go crazy, but I ate a banana with some peanut butter and 10 plain M&Ms, enjoyed a sandwich with regular, rather than non-sprouted bread, savored a pasta salad with sun-dried tomatoes and artichoke hearts, and ate some low-carb pancakes with some real maple syrup on top.

The first day my weight remained static–no gains, no losses. I can handle that. But, the second and third days I gained weight–not a lot; just a couple of pounds, but I think I have just provided a measurable case study once again proving the science behind a nonfat, low-carb diet (like Ornish or Pritikin) and healthy fats diet (like Atkins). I can have either a healthy fat meal or a nonfat, low-carb meal, but I can’t mix the two. For me:

Carbs + Fat = Weight Gain

Maybe you can mix the two, but I certainly cannot without negative consequences.

Happy Holidays!

Antibiotics and Weight Gain

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Just as a side note today, I want to mention that, in spite of steadily and joyfully losing weight on the THM diet, I have experienced a two-week setback, due to a urinary tract infection and taking the antibiotic ciprofloxacin.

Antibiotics kill the bad bacteria that cause infection, so sometimes you need to take them. However, those same antibiotics kill a lot of the good bacteria in the gut, as well. Studies show that a deficit of healthy, probiotic flora in the intestinal tract causes or leads to weight gain. (See http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/265434.php) The short version: Taking antibiotics can cause weight gain if you don’t keep pouring in the probiotics as a countermeasure.

To make matters worse, some antibiotics (such as ciprofloxacin) can increase the prostaglandin ghrelin in the body as much as six times. Ghrelin increases hunger, which leads to overeating. Ghrelin also increases abdominal fat. (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090520055519.htm)

Any way you slice it, antibiotics make you fat. So, do what you have to do to heal your body if you have to take antibiotics. All the while, keep up your probiotic intake. (Make sure you don’t take probiotics within two hours of taking your antibiotic or you’ll waste your efforts.)

Then, when you’re all well again and off the antibiotics, keep taking lots of probiotics and eat probiotic-rich foods, like kimchi, real fermented sauerkraut, real fermented dill pickles, miso, yogurt, kefir, etc. You’ll soon be back to losing that temporary excess weight and abdominal fat.

Starchy, High-Carb Vegetables vs. Non-Starchy, Low-Carb Vegetables Chart

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Because the starchy (high carbohydrate) vs. non-starchy (low carbohydrate) vegetables are so important to keep separate in the my low-carb/nonfat and healthy fats diet, I came up with yet another chart to help me keep them straight.

Here’s a recap: low-carb/nonfat meals can contain either starchy or non-starchy vegetables (although the starchy, high-carb vegetables must still be limited). Nonfat/no-starchy carbs meals and high healthy fat meals cannot contain starchy, high-carb vegetables, unless they’re strictly limited and there are no other starches or grains in the meal.

Non-Starchy Vegetables1

Starchy vegetables2

  • Amaranth or Chinese spinach
  • Artichoke
  • Artichoke hearts
  • Asparagus
  • Baby corn
  • Bamboo shoots
  • Beans (green, wax, Italian)
  • Bean sprouts
  • Beets
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage (green, bok choy, Chinese)
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery
  • Chayote
  • Cucumber
  • Daikon
  • Eggplant
  • Greens (collard, kale, mustard, turnip)
  • Hearts of palm
  • Jicama
  • Kohlrabi
  • Leeks
  • Mushrooms
  • Okra
  • Onions
  • Pea pods
  • Peppers
  • Radishes
  • Rutabaga
  • Salad greens (chicory, endive, escarole, lettuce, romaine, spinach, arugula, radicchio, watercress)
  • Sprouts
  • Squash (cushaw, summer, crookneck, spaghetti, zucchini)
  • Sugar snap peas
  • Swiss chard
  • Tomato
  • Turnips
  • Water chestnuts
  • Yard-long beans
  • Beans (dried)
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Corn
  • Parsnips
  • Peas
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkin
  • Squash, winter
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Turnips
  • Yams
  • Parsnips
  • Plantain
  • Taro
1 Copied from http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/what-can-i-eat/non-starchy-vegetables.html 2 Copied from http://www.md-health.com/Starchy-Vegetables.html

Delicious Low Calorie Party Chips (Cucumber)

I love these “chips!” I thought I invented this recipe, but in searching online I found one almost exactly like it at Kev’s Kitchen website: http://www.kevskitchen.com/?p=1077. You can munch on these chips the way you would potato or tortilla chips. Most of the calories are in the sesame seeds, but don’t skimp on them. Sesame seeds (as well as cucumbers) are super healthy and high in antioxidants. Enjoy!

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons sesame seeds
¼ cup rice vinegar
½ teaspoon stevia
¼ teaspoon kosher salt
1 large English cucumber – thinly sliced
 

Preparation:

Place the sesame seeds in a small pan over medium heat and stir often for approximately three minutes or until just toasted. Remove from het and set aside.

Mix the vinegar, stevia and salt in a small bowl until the salt is fully dissolved. (Variation: I dip my “chips” in the rice vinegar, then spread them out on a plate and sprinkle them with salt, xylitol and toasted sesame seeds.)

Toss the cucumber with the vinegar mixture and a suitable bowl and let rest for two minutes. Pour off any excess liquid then plate the cucumbers.

Sprinkle with the sesame seeds and serve immediately.

*My note: Use the freshest, coldest cucumbers so you have super crispy, crunchy chips.

Sources:

Recipe: http://www.kevskitchen.com/?p=1077

Photo: http://www.kevskitchen.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Cucumber-Sesame-Salad-300×225.jpg