Low-Carb Flours

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  • Flax flour
  • Spelt flour
  • Oat flour
  • Defatted peanut flour
  • Psyllium husk powder
  • Quinoa flour

I recently made some low-carb chocolate chip cookies using oat flour. I’ll share the recipe in my next blog, but I thought I’d let you know that I used small chunks and shavings of unsweetened baking chocolate. The xylitol in the cookies is enough to sweeten the chocolate. Again, if you’re accustomed to eating less sugar, the sugar-free cookies taste great. Otherwise, you might want to add more xylitol to the recipe.

Happy New Year!

Counting Carbohydrates and Limiting Fats in Nonfat, Moderate-Carb Meals

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Sometimes I really wish I could add a little more fat to nonfat, moderate-carbohydrate meals, but add too much fat and you’ll start packing on the pounds. (I try to keep moderate-carbohydrate meals or snacks to no more than 45 carbohydrates.)

So, how many grams of fat are in 2 teaspoons? It varies according to the fat in question.

2 teaspoons of peanut butter = 4 grams of fat.

2 teaspoons of almond butter = about 6 grams of fat.

2 teaspoons of Earth Balance margarine = about 7 grams of fat.

What about egg yolks? One egg yolk is equal to 1 Tablespoon. However, there are only 4.5 grams of fat in an egg yolk. Trim Healthy Mama experts advise no more than 4 grams of fat per nonfat, moderate-carbohydrate meal and yet there can be up to 7 grams of fat in 2 teaspoons of some foods, like almond butter or margarine. My conclusion? 4.5 grams of fat has not caused me to gain weight in a nonfat, moderate-carbohydrate meal, so I often go ahead and leave the yolk in my egg. However, that means no margarine—not even the thinnest spread—on my toast. I think it’s a good trade.

Nonfat, Low-Carb Meal Plan Ideas

Macaroni and Cheese: Low-carb Dreamfields pasta with 1 tsp of Earth Balance, a splash of almond milk, and some grated nonfat cheese (like skim mozzarella and parmesan)

Fried egg, skim mozzarella cheese, turkey breast on sprouted grain toast

Carbs + Fat = Weight Gain

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For the past three days I decided to take a break from my diet by mixing a few fats and carbs in one or two meals per day. I didn’t go crazy, but I ate a banana with some peanut butter and 10 plain M&Ms, enjoyed a sandwich with regular, rather than non-sprouted bread, savored a pasta salad with sun-dried tomatoes and artichoke hearts, and ate some low-carb pancakes with some real maple syrup on top.

The first day my weight remained static–no gains, no losses. I can handle that. But, the second and third days I gained weight–not a lot; just a couple of pounds, but I think I have just provided a measurable case study once again proving the science behind a nonfat, low-carb diet (like Ornish or Pritikin) and healthy fats diet (like Atkins). I can have either a healthy fat meal or a nonfat, low-carb meal, but I can’t mix the two. For me:

Carbs + Fat = Weight Gain

Maybe you can mix the two, but I certainly cannot without negative consequences.

Happy Holidays!