Nonfat, Low-Carb Chocolate Chip Cookies

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Ingredients Grams of Carbohydrate Grams of Fat
Dry Ingredients
1 cup oat flour (You could substitute flax or spelt.) 58.5 0
1 t baking powder 1.2 0
½ t soda 0 0
½ t salt 0 0
½ t cinnamon 0 0
2 T peanut butter 6 16
1 c xylitol 48* 0
Wet Ingredients
1 T molasses 15 0
2 T egg white 0 0
¼ cup applesauce 7 0
½ tsp vanilla 0 0
2 cups quinoa flakes 218 0
.25 cup semisweet chocolate** 41.3 0
.25 cup baking chocolate 8 14
Instructions:Mix dry ingredients and wet ingredients separately. Combine. Drop by rounded teaspoon onto lightly greased cookie sheet. Bake at 350 degrees for 10-12’. Makes 30 cookies
Total carbs and fats in entire recipe 403 30
Total divided by 30 cookies 13.43 1.2
Number of grams of carbohydrates and fats allowed in a single THM snack 45 4-9

*There are 4 grams of carbohydrates / tsp in NOW brand.

**Please Note: I have also made this recipe with unsweetened baking chocolate. Doing so cuts the refined sugar to zero and reduces the carbs considerably.

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Low-Carb Flours

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  • Flax flour
  • Spelt flour
  • Oat flour
  • Defatted peanut flour
  • Psyllium husk powder
  • Quinoa flour

I recently made some low-carb chocolate chip cookies using oat flour. I’ll share the recipe in my next blog, but I thought I’d let you know that I used small chunks and shavings of unsweetened baking chocolate. The xylitol in the cookies is enough to sweeten the chocolate. Again, if you’re accustomed to eating less sugar, the sugar-free cookies taste great. Otherwise, you might want to add more xylitol to the recipe.

Happy New Year!

Counting Carbohydrates and Limiting Fats in Nonfat, Moderate-Carb Meals

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Sometimes I really wish I could add a little more fat to nonfat, moderate-carbohydrate meals, but add too much fat and you’ll start packing on the pounds. (I try to keep moderate-carbohydrate meals or snacks to no more than 45 carbohydrates.)

So, how many grams of fat are in 2 teaspoons? It varies according to the fat in question.

2 teaspoons of peanut butter = 4 grams of fat.

2 teaspoons of almond butter = about 6 grams of fat.

2 teaspoons of Earth Balance margarine = about 7 grams of fat.

What about egg yolks? One egg yolk is equal to 1 Tablespoon. However, there are only 4.5 grams of fat in an egg yolk. Trim Healthy Mama experts advise no more than 4 grams of fat per nonfat, moderate-carbohydrate meal and yet there can be up to 7 grams of fat in 2 teaspoons of some foods, like almond butter or margarine. My conclusion? 4.5 grams of fat has not caused me to gain weight in a nonfat, moderate-carbohydrate meal, so I often go ahead and leave the yolk in my egg. However, that means no margarine—not even the thinnest spread—on my toast. I think it’s a good trade.

Nonfat, Low-Carb Meal Plan Ideas

Macaroni and Cheese: Low-carb Dreamfields pasta with 1 tsp of Earth Balance, a splash of almond milk, and some grated nonfat cheese (like skim mozzarella and parmesan)

Fried egg, skim mozzarella cheese, turkey breast on sprouted grain toast

Carbs + Fat = Weight Gain

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For the past three days I decided to take a break from my diet by mixing a few fats and carbs in one or two meals per day. I didn’t go crazy, but I ate a banana with some peanut butter and 10 plain M&Ms, enjoyed a sandwich with regular, rather than non-sprouted bread, savored a pasta salad with sun-dried tomatoes and artichoke hearts, and ate some low-carb pancakes with some real maple syrup on top.

The first day my weight remained static–no gains, no losses. I can handle that. But, the second and third days I gained weight–not a lot; just a couple of pounds, but I think I have just provided a measurable case study once again proving the science behind a nonfat, low-carb diet (like Ornish or Pritikin) and healthy fats diet (like Atkins). I can have either a healthy fat meal or a nonfat, low-carb meal, but I can’t mix the two. For me:

Carbs + Fat = Weight Gain

Maybe you can mix the two, but I certainly cannot without negative consequences.

Happy Holidays!

Antibiotics and Weight Gain

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Just as a side note today, I want to mention that, in spite of steadily and joyfully losing weight on the THM diet, I have experienced a two-week setback, due to a urinary tract infection and taking the antibiotic ciprofloxacin.

Antibiotics kill the bad bacteria that cause infection, so sometimes you need to take them. However, those same antibiotics kill a lot of the good bacteria in the gut, as well. Studies show that a deficit of healthy, probiotic flora in the intestinal tract causes or leads to weight gain. (See http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/265434.php) The short version: Taking antibiotics can cause weight gain if you don’t keep pouring in the probiotics as a countermeasure.

To make matters worse, some antibiotics (such as ciprofloxacin) can increase the prostaglandin ghrelin in the body as much as six times. Ghrelin increases hunger, which leads to overeating. Ghrelin also increases abdominal fat. (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090520055519.htm)

Any way you slice it, antibiotics make you fat. So, do what you have to do to heal your body if you have to take antibiotics. All the while, keep up your probiotic intake. (Make sure you don’t take probiotics within two hours of taking your antibiotic or you’ll waste your efforts.)

Then, when you’re all well again and off the antibiotics, keep taking lots of probiotics and eat probiotic-rich foods, like kimchi, real fermented sauerkraut, real fermented dill pickles, miso, yogurt, kefir, etc. You’ll soon be back to losing that temporary excess weight and abdominal fat.