Low Carb Cloud Bread

Blk & Wh James on Beach

For your protein-based, healthy fat meals there’s very little grain or bread allowed, so I searched the internet and found this recipe for bread made largely of whole eggs. The recipe takes a bit of extra time and effort, since you have to whip the egg yolks and whites separately, bake; then store the bread rounds in plastic bags overnight, but this is now my favorite low-carb bread recipe. I think in the future I’ll experiment with adding some psyllium husk, ground flax seed, or glucommanan. Enjoy!

Cloud Bread

3 eggs, separated
3 tablespoons whole milk cottage cheese or 3 tablespoons cream cheese
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 gram of xylitol or other sweetener

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees.
2. Separate the eggs very carefully, there must be no yolk in the white.
3. In one bowl, mix together the egg yolks, the 3 T. of Cottage Cheese OR Cream Cheese and the one packet of Sweetener until smooth.
4. In the other bowl add 1/4 teaspoon of Cream of Tartar to the whites and beat the whites on high speed until they are fluffy and form nice peaks.
5. Very carefully fold the egg yolk mixture into the egg whites until mixed, but try and not break down the fluffiness of the egg whites too much.
6. Spray two cookie sheets with fat-free cooking spray.
7. With a large spoon, “scoop” the mixture into 10 even rounds on the sheets (about the size of the top-half of the McDonalds hamburger bun; roughly 3/4 inch thick and 4 to 5 inches across).
8. Bake on the middle rack. Here is when you have to watch them, because the cooking time the same on any two batches. It is somewhere around 1/2 hour, but it could be less or more. You just need to watch them until them become nice and golden brown like a pancake.
9. Remove from the pans and cool on a rack or cutting board.
10. While warm they are crumbly and similar to cooked meringue – but don’t let this fool you! Once completely cool, seal them in a ziplock storage baggie or a tupperware overnight. They will totally change their consistency, to something much more like bread – a softer texture that is nice and chewy. If you do not like softer chewy bread, then eat them as they are, nice and crisp.

I even added some pecans, cinnamon, and xylitol to a couple of rounds and enjoyed what was very similar to a cinnamon roll.

Copied from http://www.food.com/recipe/carb-free-cloud-bread-411501

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Starchy, High-Carb Vegetables vs. Non-Starchy, Low-Carb Vegetables Chart

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Because the starchy (high carbohydrate) vs. non-starchy (low carbohydrate) vegetables are so important to keep separate in the my low-carb/nonfat and healthy fats diet, I came up with yet another chart to help me keep them straight.

Here’s a recap: low-carb/nonfat meals can contain either starchy or non-starchy vegetables (although the starchy, high-carb vegetables must still be limited). Nonfat/no-starchy carbs meals and high healthy fat meals cannot contain starchy, high-carb vegetables, unless they’re strictly limited and there are no other starches or grains in the meal.

Non-Starchy Vegetables1

Starchy vegetables2

  • Amaranth or Chinese spinach
  • Artichoke
  • Artichoke hearts
  • Asparagus
  • Baby corn
  • Bamboo shoots
  • Beans (green, wax, Italian)
  • Bean sprouts
  • Beets
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage (green, bok choy, Chinese)
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery
  • Chayote
  • Cucumber
  • Daikon
  • Eggplant
  • Greens (collard, kale, mustard, turnip)
  • Hearts of palm
  • Jicama
  • Kohlrabi
  • Leeks
  • Mushrooms
  • Okra
  • Onions
  • Pea pods
  • Peppers
  • Radishes
  • Rutabaga
  • Salad greens (chicory, endive, escarole, lettuce, romaine, spinach, arugula, radicchio, watercress)
  • Sprouts
  • Squash (cushaw, summer, crookneck, spaghetti, zucchini)
  • Sugar snap peas
  • Swiss chard
  • Tomato
  • Turnips
  • Water chestnuts
  • Yard-long beans
  • Beans (dried)
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Corn
  • Parsnips
  • Peas
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkin
  • Squash, winter
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Turnips
  • Yams
  • Parsnips
  • Plantain
  • Taro
1 Copied from http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/what-can-i-eat/non-starchy-vegetables.html 2 Copied from http://www.md-health.com/Starchy-Vegetables.html

Lowfat Pumpkin Pie Recipe

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Okay, so I’m not a chef, so let me make that clear from the get-go. Also, I have been off of refined sugars for almost 8 months now (with a few innocuous weekly cheats now and then), so my sweet tooth is significantly diminished. I say this as a caveat, because I think this pie is deliciously sweet, whereas someone who’s used to eating sugar may think my recipe is pretty bland.

Lowfat Pumpkin Pie

1-1.5 cups nut/seed milk (almond or hemp)

1 T egg white

½ tsp glucommanan powder

1 tsp vanilla

2 cups mashed pumpkin

½ c nut flour

2 tsp baking powder

1/3 cup xylitol

¼ tsp ginger

1 tsp cinnamon

½ tsp nutmeg

¼ tsp ground cloves

½ tsp salt

  1. Preheat oven to 350. Spray 9” deep pie pan with cooking spray.
  2. Put 1st 5 ingredients in blender. Add pumpkin. Add other ingredients and blend on high for 2 minutes.
  3. Pour into pie pan and bake 60 minutes.
  4. Remove from oven. Cool. Chill. Top with Reddi Wip.

Exercise and Nonfat/Low-Carb Meals

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I have been on this THM diet now for a little over a month. I lost 6 pounds right away and now, although I’m so glad I haven’t gained back anything, I have stalled again. I know how that goes in weight loss. Some weeks you lose weight in ounces and pounds; other weeks you lose centimeters and inches in various parts of your body. Thankfully, this stall in weight loss is not a failure, as I have lost a whole inch in my waist, hips, and upper arms! So, if you’re on this THM journey, don’t despair. When your weight loss stalls, measure yourself and you’ll likely be happily surprised with your progress!

Many of you have asked me about my daily workout regimen. I’m not an athlete and I get bored super easily, so I change what I do almost daily—which I now know is good for weight loss and muscle gain, since the body can never get stuck in a rut. I exercise six days a week for anywhere from 20-60 minutes doing anything from swimming laps at the local gym, taking ballet classes, doing pilates and yoga, walking, hiking, cycling, jogging, and HIIT Crossfit (the easier at-home versions without barbells). I love to talk, so if I can do any of the above with a friend (either in person or on the phone), it makes the time pass more quickly so I don’t get bored.

Honestly, the nonfat, low-carb meals are the least fun of weight loss foods, so I tend to avoid them. However, let me remind me of Pearl and Serene’s definition of a “Fuel Pull” meal: Fuel Pull refers to your body’s ability to pull fuel from stored fat. The meals are low in both fats and carbohydrates. Those meals, combined with exercise, push my body to the next level and help me to shed more unwanted fat and ounces (if not a full pound). And, truth be told, “Fuel Pull” snacks are some of the easiest to throw together and eat quickly, since the prep work is minimal and largely mindless.

When I have a busy day ahead, I often pack for meals on the go—great for those all-day shopping trips or long commutes. My on-the-go go-to “Fuel Pull” meal plan is often as follows:

Breakfast: “Fuel Pull” chocolate glucommanan smoothie

Snack: handful of nuts and some celery sticks

Lunch: Wasa crackers spread with Laughing Cow or Weight Watchers cheese, topped with turkey breast, lettuce and slices of tomato or cucumber. Sometimes I add slices of avocado too—but don’t go over ½ an avocado in one meal.

Snack: glass container of nonfat Greek yogurt, xylitol, cocoa powder, and strawberries (stored in a cooler)

Dinner: skim mozzarella cheese wrapped in a slice of turkey breast with any type of easy-to-eat “FP” vegetable (cucumber spears, celery sticks, bell pepper strips, etc.), and either more avocado or some low-fat, low sugar, low carb mayonnaise.

Dessert: If I have some “FP” cake or brownie made up ahead of time I’ll take that with me, but otherwise I eat another of my strawberry yogurt blends. The cocoa powder helps to satisfy my chocolate cravings.

Looking back over my food diary, no matter how busy I have been or how much I have eaten on my “FP” days, I have never failed to lose between .5 and 1 pound –even when I mixed things up and ate a non-“Fuel Pull” meal somewhere in there. I can’t complain about that!