Is Raw, Unpasteurized Milk Safe?

There is a lot of controversy regarding whether or not it is safe to drink raw, unpasteurized milk. Much of the controversy stems from a few cases of bad bacteria getting into raw milk (which can and should be prevented quite easily if one is careful to keep the milk clean after milking). Did you know there are far more cases of bacteria poisoning from pasteurized milk? But few people ever mention that fact.
Additionally, there is a strong argument that grain-fed cow’s milk is not as healthy as organic, grain-fed cow’s milk, and then there’s the whole A1 vs. A2 cow types that I still don’t fully understand yet. More on these subjects as I continue to research them.
For now, I wanted to copy and paste an excerpt of what Sally Fallon said on the safety of unpasteurized milk:
Today if you mention raw milk, many people gasp and utter ridiculous statements like, “You can die from drinking raw milk!” But the truth is that there are far more risks from drinking pasteurized milk than unpasteurized milk. Raw milk naturally contains healthy bacteria that inhibit the growth of undesirable and dangerous organisms. Without these friendly bacteria, pasteurized milk is more susceptible to contamination. Furthermore, modern equipment, such as milking machines, stainless steel tanks and refrigerated trucks, make it entirely possible to bring clean, raw milk to the market anywhere in the US.
Not only does pasteurization kill the friendly bacteria, it also greatly diminishes the nutrient content of the milk. Pasteurized milk has up to a 66 percent loss of vitamins A, D and E. Vitamin C loss usually exceeds 50 percent. Heat affects water soluble vitamins and can make them 38 percent to 80 percent less effective. Vitamins B6 and B12 are completely destroyed during pasteurization. Pasteurization also destroys beneficial enzymes, antibodies and hormones. Pasteurization destroys lipase (an enzyme that breaks down fat), which impairs fat metabolism and the ability to properly absorb fat soluble vitamins A and D. (The dairy industry is aware of the diminished vitamin D content in commercial milk, so they fortify it with a form of this vitamin.)
We have all been led to believe that milk is a wonderful source of calcium, when in fact, pasteurization makes calcium and other minerals less available. Complete destruction of phosphatase is one method of testing to see if milk has been adequately pasteurized. Phosphatase is essential for the absorption of calcium.
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